Holiday Hysteria

Anyone else starting to feel that Holiday Hysteria setting in? I’ve been so immersed in mod podge and powdered sugar that again, as always, Christmas has snuck up on me. And I’m not prepared for it.

House is a disaster – Christmas party last night was successful and delicious though! BBQ sauce is still sitting in the crock pot on the counter. I’m wrapped in a sherpa throw playing video games… gotta love a hangover.

Plans for my Christmas vacation may be falling through which was apparently the tipping point to my already fragile mind-set.

Women – don’t you hate when you’re talking and out-of-nowhere, get entirely too emotional? Didn’t realize you felt that way did you. Well I didn’t realize that with great crafting comes great responsibility and I have a Christmas tree overflowing with presents this year… but. Here comes my crippling manic-depressive-holiday-hysteria that has reduced me to tears at the thought of leaving my house.

Our society, in America at least, the topic of mental illness is shunned, misunderstood, and stigmatized.

Dictionary definitions of stigma describe it as a mark of disgrace, shame, dishonor, ignominy, opprobrium, humiliation, or bad reputation unfairly attached to a person, group, or quality. Tellingly, “the stigma of mental disorder” is almost always offered as the first and most classic example.

A troubling paradox has developed in the stigma attached to mental illness—never has there been less stigma for having mild psychiatric problems, but never has there been more stigma for having severe ones.

–Allen Frances, MD

A troubling paradox has, I think, developed in the stigma attached to mental illness—never has there been less stigma for having mild psychiatric problems, but never has there been more stigma for having severe ones. This has come about because the definition of mental illness is now so loose—1 in 4 of us qualifies every year; 1 in 2 qualifies in a lifetime; and 1 in 5 is taking a psychiatric medicine. There is enormous power in these numbers. The sting of having a psychiatric diagnosis or receiving a treatment is much reduced when so many people take psychiatric medication or participate in psychotherapy.

– See more at: http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/forensic-psychiatry/stigmatizing-and-shunning-severely-ill#sthash.DZV2sJcT.dpuf

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